Apple Brings Tech To HBCUs

 

From Grambling State University graduate to Apple’s VP for Inclusion and Diversity, Denise Young Smith is displaying black girl magic. Smith held a leadership position at Apple for over 10 years while providing her expertise in HR and management consulting. However, she has been involved with several diversity programs throughout her tenure at Apple, this new role of Vice President of diversity shows Apple taking serious actions to increase diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Last June, Apple reported that their workforce consists of “56% white, 19% Asian, 12% Hispanic, and 9% black.” It does make sense to place a minority or person of color in a top leadership position for diversity and inclusion. With the lack of diversity in the tech industry, Michael Connor of Open Mic says, “investors are starting to make a business case for diversity.” Connor, an executive director of Open MIC, encourage shareholders like Apple to obtain “more sustainable practices at publicly traded companies.” Apple is leaning in the right direction by partner with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF), and Houston Community College (HCC). Check out more about Apple’s Diversity department.

Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) collaborated with Apple to promote the Apple HBCU Scholars Program that targets STEM students. Selected juniors and seniors will participate in a 12 week paid internship at Apple headquarters, mentorship, become an ambassador, and receive up to $25,000 in scholarship for their last year of study. The criteria include a minimum of 3.25 GPA, full-time junior or senior, and expressing technical and cultural abilities. The deadline has passed for the Apple HBCU Scholars Program, but you can still apply for the TMCF Lowe’s Gap Scholarship. This scholarship is for graduating seniors needing financial assistance for the Spring or Summer 2017 semesters. The deadline is June 30, 2017.

Apple is joining forces with Houston Community College (HCC) to bring tech to the students. Last month, HCC announced the launch of the iOD Coding Design School (iCDS) to assist students on developing “developing iOS apps and coding in the iOS platform.”  With a majority of HCC students consisting of African Americans or Hispanics, this will bring more minorities into the tech sector.

 

Amber Peters64 Posts

Amber Peters is a current MBA candidate and full-time Accountant. She is a proud Alumna of Texas Southern University. “Faith without work means nothing”

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