Have You Heard What Charles Barkley Has To Say On HBCUS & The Black Race

NBA’s 1993 MVP, now sports anchor icon Charles Barkley had much to say when asked his opinion on what he thinks about the black race.

Dating back to July of last year, when Melissa Chan of TIME Magazine questioned Barkley about the continuous acts of police brutality, Barkley responded with “We as black people have got to do better”.

From my personal experience as a black man in America, I find myself holding back the urge to counterattack numerous times throughout the day. Only a black man understands the feeling of having smart remarks thrown at you, the feeling of having to tell your accomplishments during every opportunity so “they” won’t think you are uneducated. The uncomfortable feeling an older white man can give you by speaking to you as if you don’t possess the skill or knowledge to be on his level. I definitely agree with Barkley, that we as a race have to make better decisions. We have to think before we act, which is something we are taught at a very young age.

Charles Barkely is also known to be overly sarcastic at times to the point that some people may dislike him in which he totally understands.

The Shadow League spoke with Barkely to ask him about his million dollar donation to HBCU’s across the country. “I just gave Morehouse, Clark Atlanta and Alabama A&M in Huntsville a million dollars to help black kids go to college” says Barkley in which he receives much flack from the black community because he did not publicize his deed. He states that he does not indulge in social media and never will because he feels that once information is out for the world to see, there is no turning back.

As Reported on http://www.complex.com/

Barkley: There’s a lot of people at fault. The cops have made some mistakes. Black people have made some mistakes. Until we stop…We have to sit back and be honest with each other. The cops have made some mistakes. That don’t give us the right to riot and shoot cops. We need the cops, especially in the black community. We as black people, we’ve got to do better. We never get mad when black people kill each other, which that always has bothered me. It’s always bothered me. And then, somebody is gonna scream like, ‘Well, you can’t change the subject.’ Well, first of all, I’ve never changed the subject. I’ve always said that, ‘We as black people, if you want respect, you have to give each other respect.’ You can’t demand respect from white people and the cops if we don’t respect each other.

We got to do better as black people. The cops have made some mistakes, but there’s a lot of blame to go around. But I’m not going to get on TV and yell like all these other idiots. I’m willing to sit down with anybody and have constructive criticism. I always tell myself as a black man: ‘Am I part of the problem or part of the solution?’ If I’m out doing illegal stuff, stupid stuff, I’m part of the problem. If I’m helping young black kids go to college like I’m trying to do, if I’m giving money to causes to help young men, I know I’m part of the solution. I’m not perfect, I’m not trying to be perfect, but you have to ask yourself: ‘Are you part of the problem or are you part of the solution?’

I respect and admire what cops do. My bodyguard is a cop, a black cop. We talk about situations all the time. One of the problems with this stuff is the media—all these people are Monday morning quarterbacks. Do you know what they are, Dan? They’re Monday morning quarterbacks, because they don’t have the stones to play on Sunday. Everybody says what I would do or what I should do. I think some of these cops are panicking under pressure. I had a real in-depth conversation with my bodyguard about the gun thing in Minnesota. You know, Dan, I’m a gun guy, and he always warns me. He says, ‘Do not put your ID where your gun is.’ He says, ‘What I think…’ He says, ‘Whether we think the cop is right or wrong…’ First of all, everything is happening in fast motion. Everybody gets to sit back and see what happens. He says, ‘What I think happened is that guy said, Can I have your ID?’ And then the next thing he said is, ‘I have a gun,’ and he reaches. And I think the cop just panicked.

Le Batard: I know, but Charles, they’re more likely to panic around black people because there’s a fear…

Barkley: Well, Dan, because in fairness, because some black people out there are crooks. You can’t sit there and act like all these—and first of all, I’m not saying in that situation—there’s a reason there’s some…and I’m not saying that’s right, either. There is some reason why there’s racial stereotypes because some of these black people out there are committing crimes. Let’s don’t sit there and act like all our hands are clean.

Le Batard: I know, but Charles, you can’t be profiling like that. I understand…

Barkley: Dan, these guys are dealing with criminals everyday, and that’s easy for you to say. That’s easy for you to say. And like I said, I’m not saying they should racially profile guys. But I’m saying we can’t jump to conclusions every time, like, just because a guy is black. First of all, there is racial profiling. There has always been racism. First of all, there’s racism on both sides, let’s get that straight. But to just assume…First of all, if you go back and look at that thing in Louisiana, I think those cops clearly overreacted, but there’s no doubt in my mind that if I’m fighting with a guy and I hear somebody scream “Gun!” and I got a gun, I’m going to shoot the guy. And like I said, the cops probably did overreact in both situations, but we got to look at the big picture. Let’s work with the cops, because we need the cops, Dan. If it wasn’t for the cops, we would be living in the Wild, Wild West. And let me get this straight: Cops have made mistakes, but as a black person, every time you…hey, listen, we still got to do better. But like I say, why don’t black people get mad when we kill each other? I’m not trying to deflect or place blame, that’s just a fact.

Le Batard: That’s not true, Charles.

Barkley: It is true, Dan. Dan, first of all, you’re not black.

Le Batard: I know I’m not black, but that’s not true that black people don’t get mad that other black people are killing black people. That’s not true.

Barkley: We don’t have near the outrage we do when a white cop kills somebody. Dan, I been black my whole life, and most black people I know are killed by other black people. And I never understood why there’s not more outrage about the way we treat each other as black people.

Le Batard: It can be both, Charles.

Barkley: It can be both. But, Dan, first of all, if you’re going to sit on TV and say there’s the same moral outrage when black people kill each other as when white people kill each other, that’s just disingenuous on your part.

Barkley ended his rant by saying “one thing I understand about being black and famous is a lot of black people are full of shit. I’m good with that”. This statement was to bash the African American race, but to tell the media that many celebrities talk about giving back, but never do. It was also a shot at the famous individuals who just give back in order to look like they are doing a favor to the community for recognition.

What are your thoughts on Charles Barkley comments?

Steffon Johnson15 Posts

Steffon Dreshad Johnson better known as 'Official Steffon' is a 23-year-old Journalist from College Station, Texas who started his journey in 2011 as a determined undergrad at The Prairie View A&M University.Before earning his bachelor's degree in Mass Communications with an emphasis in marketing, Official Steffon worked for 101X Jason and Deb Morning Show (Austin, TX), 101.9 The Beat (Bryan, TX), and K.A.Z.I 88.7 (Austin, TX) ' . Steffon strives to be a mogul in both the entertainment and business industry. He gets a rush out of being a gatekeeper by uncovering new information to reveal to his audience. Official Steffon is now dedicated to taking his radio show global by exceeding to grab exclusive interviews from the hottest icons in the game.He says he enjoys genuine vibes and strongly believes everyone has something to teach the next person.

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